Paul Rako

Paul
Rako
Creative Writer,
Atmel Corporate Marketing

 

Paul Rako is a creative writer for Atmel corporate marketing. After attending GMI (now Kettering University) and the University of Michigan, he worked as an auto engineer in Detroit. He next moved to Silicon Valley to start an engineering consulting company. After his share of startups and contract work, he became an apps engineer at National Semiconductor and a marketing maven at Analog Devices. He also had a five-year stint at EDN magazine on the analog beat. His interests include politics, philosophy, motorcycles, and making music and videos. He has six Harley Sportsters, a studio full of musical instruments, a complete laboratory, and a 10,000-pound milling machine at his Domicile of the Future in Sunnyvale, Calif. 

 
Articles
What’s All This Bias Current Stuff, Anyhow? 2
In 2006, Bob Pease exchanged e-mails with an engineer having some trouble with an integrator circuit. Bob's solution holds up well today.
What’s All This Capacitive Loading, Stuff, Anyhow? 1
In 2008, Bob Pease exchanged e-mails with Linear Technology’s Mark Thoren, Paul Rako, and a few other friends about a tough subject—how an amplifier will oscillate if you put a capacitive load on it.
What’s All This Meter Accuracy Stuff, Anyhow? 8
Bob Pease and Reginald Neale exchanged a series of letters back in 1989 addressing the age old question of accuracy versus precision in their test equipment.
What’s All This Solenoid Driver Stuff, Anyhow? 13
Paul Rako recalls an exchange with the late Bob Pease about a solenoid driver he found on the Web. Of course, Bob had plenty of criticism and advice as he drew up his own version of the circuit.
What’s All This RIP (Rest In Pease) Stuff, Anyhow? 13
On the second anniversary of Bob Pease's death, Paul Rako remembers the qualities that made the analog guru such a fine engineer and a good friend.
Commentaries and Blogs
Guest Blogs
Aug 11, 2015
Commentary

Proof-of-Concept Prototypes versus Manufacturing Design Preparations 3

I have designed many early-stage proof-of-concept (POC) circuits, and observed many others do the same thing. It seems that there is often a huge disconnect between clients and engineers, though, when it comes to the goals of a POC design. In simple terms, an engineer worth his salt will overdesign an early POC circuit. This is because Murphy’s law always applies, and POCs are about overcoming unknowns. By overdesigning the circuit, one is able to prove the client’s product POC can be made to work, and quickly....More
Aug 4, 2015
blog

Inconspicuous Pitfalls in Datasheet Analysis

Identifying the limitations of a datasheet saves lots of time, and cost, in terms of troubleshooting and redesigning circuits....More
Jun 30, 2015
Commentary

Four-Wire Sensing Can Make or Break Your Measurements 7

Erroneously implementing four-wire sensing into a measurement instrument can be disastrous, so it becomes critical to have a firm grasp of how sense lines function....More

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