Why Blog Now?


Ok. Something new. We are doing blogs on Electronic Design!

Actually I've been doing this for awhile now but under different headings. This includes my Lab Bench column that is in each print issue of Electronic Design as well as my hands-on column, Bill's Workbench, where I try out things like development kits, build arbitrary projects and otherwise vent. Guess I will have to do some of the latter here.

My other columns will continue so check out the latest as well as past articles.There is almost a decade's worth on Bill's Workbench. It is interesting to see how things have improved over the years. When I started it the dev kits of the day tended to be expensive and minimal. Not every vendor has caught on but low cost dev kits are the norm these days. Kits the incorporate references designs are on the rise.

One I am looking forward to testing soon is Bug Labs's latest Bug 2.0. If you have not see this neat platform before then check out " Build With A Bug". The base is built around a Texas Instrument's OMAP processor.

It runs Linux and Java.

It has sockets for four Bug modules.

Really neat stuff.

More later.

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What's alt.embedded?

Blogs focusing on embedded, software and systems


William Wong

Bill Wong covers Digital, Embedded, Systems and Software topics at Electronic Design. He writes a number of columns, including Lab Bench and alt.embedded, plus Bill's Workbench hands-on column....
Commentaries and Blogs
Guest Blogs
Oct 7, 2015

Building Home or Very Small Office Electronic-Circuit Prototypes, Part 1 3

This first part in a series goes through the steps of creating a preliminary design for a small and inexpensive hobbyist/limited-technology-prototype build-and-test capability....More
Sep 16, 2015

What is All This Nanogenerator Stuff, Anyway?

Nanogenerators, which harvest energy from the environment, could be the next big thing in renewable energy....More
Aug 11, 2015

Proof-of-Concept Prototypes versus Manufacturing Design Preparations 4

I have designed many early-stage proof-of-concept (POC) circuits, and observed many others do the same thing. It seems that there is often a huge disconnect between clients and engineers, though, when it comes to the goals of a POC design. In simple terms, an engineer worth his salt will overdesign an early POC circuit. This is because Murphy’s law always applies, and POCs are about overcoming unknowns. By overdesigning the circuit, one is able to prove the client’s product POC can be made to work, and quickly....More

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